Thinking about preaching on some Psalms…..

What this is… This is not a finished article! I find it helpful to write in order to try and understand things as I prepare my sermons. That is what this is! It occurred to me that my blog provided an ideal way of keeping old bits of thinking. I hope that they are useful to you, but please remember what they are!

I’ve been thinking about a  preaching series on Psalms for Sunday evenings come September. I’m wondering if it might be helpful to look at different Psalms using the title format: “A song for…..”

The Good Book Company publish a little study guide that uses this format entitled “Soul Songs”. We may well use this as the House Group material next term. The booklet has the following titles:

Psalms 3 and 4 “A song for sleepless nights”
Psalm 16 “A song for when sin seems good”
Psalm 18 “A song for when we want to run away”
Psalm 23 “A song for dark days”
Psalm 27 “A song for when we are afraid.”
Psalm 32 “A song for secret guilt.”

Wondering if their list could be extended I looked through the Psalms and noticed where there is a comment concerning their occasion. Here is a list for those who are interested. I’ve left out Psalms with musical comments and Psalms listed as for individuals:

Psalm 3: A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son.
Psalm 7: A Shiggaion of David, which he sang to the LORD concerning the words of Cush, a Benjaminite.
Psalm 18: To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David, the servant of the LORD, who addressed the words of this song to the LORD on the day when the LORD rescued him from the hand of all his enemies, and from the hand of Saul.
Psalm 30: A Psalm of David. A song at the dedication of the temple.
Psalm 34: Of David, when he changed his behavior before Abimelech, so that he drove him out, and he went away.
Psalm 38: A Psalm of David, for the memorial offering.
Psalm 45: To the choirmaster: according to Lilies. A Maskil of the Sons of Korah; a love song.
Psalm 51: To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David, when Nathan the prophet went to him, after he had gone in to Bathsheba.
Psalm 52: To the choirmaster. A Maskil of David, when Doeg, the Edomite, came and told Saul, “David has come to the house of Ahimelech.”
Psalm 54: To the choirmaster: with stringed instruments. A Maskil of David, when the Ziphites went and told Saul, “Is not David hiding among us?”
Psalm 56: To the choirmaster: according to The Dove on Far-off Terebinths. A Miktam of David, when the Philistines seized him in Gath.
Psalm 57: To the choirmaster: according to Do Not Destroy. A Miktam of David, when he fled from Saul, in the cave.
Psalm 59: To the choirmaster: according to Do Not Destroy. A Miktam of David, when Saul sent men to watch his house in order to kill him.
Psalm 60: To the choirmaster: according to Shushan Eduth. A Miktam of David; for instruction; when he strove with Aram-naharaim and with Aram-zobah, and when Joab on his return struck down twelve thousand of Edom in the Valley of Salt.
Psalm 63: A Psalm of David, when he was in the wilderness of Judah.
Psalm 70: To the choirmaster. Of David, for the memorial offering.
Psalm 102: A Prayer of one afflicted, when he is faint and pours out his complaint before the LORD.
Psalms 120-134 A Song of Ascents.
Psalm 142: A Maskil of David, when he was in the cave. A Prayer.

I’m still thinking about this, but here are some of the Psalms I may do!

Psalm 42 “A song for battling depression”
Psalm 46 “A song for days of turmoil”
Psalm 51 “A song for when I have sinned”
Psalm 57 “A song for trouble”
Psalm 95 “A song for the Lord’s day” or “A song for tender hearts”
Psalm 117 “A song of missionary passion”
Psalm 148(or149,150) “A song for praising”
Psalms 3,4,5,7,10,13,17 or 25 “A song for lamenting”

I should probably do one of the imprecatory psalms (the ones with curses in them. See for example Psalms 69 and 109)

If you have read this and you want to make a comment – then feel free!

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